Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Another argument against the BBT

In The Equivalence Principle and the Big Bang Theory, we explored the idea that the galaxies are exhibiting a redshift that can be interpreted either as a Doppler effect, that is, they are moving away, or as a gravitational shift, in which case we can safely say they are at rest with each other. An argument for the BBT that every observer in the universe will see every other galaxy moving away is often used to validate the BBT. This argument is misleading. It is only partially true if one ignores that velocity has not only magnitude but it has also a direction.



According to an observer in our galaxy, he sees every other galaxy moving away. (Black Arrows). However, an observer from another galaxy, say the blue one, sees the other galaxies moving away but in different directions than what we see (Blue Arrows).



We will agree with her concerning both of our galaxies - She sees us move away from her, we see her moving away from us along the same line, and since motion is relative, our observation agrees. However, we will disagree about the direction for galaxies Red, Green and any other galaxy not situated along the line joining our two galaxies.

On the other hand, if we agree that instead of a Doppler shift, the galaxies are exhibiting a gravitational shift and are at rest with each other, then we all agree that the net force on any galaxy is zero.



Cosmic Microwave Background

The last remaining argument in favor of the BBT is the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It has been said that only a Hot Big Bang scenario can explain the CMB, and any other explanation would have to be contrived. In future blogs, I will demonstrate that the explanation of the CMB from a Hot Big Bang scenario is itself contrived. Stay tuned.

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